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Benjamin Franklin Jamison,
 Twice a Civil War Soldier And More

by Gaylord Wayne Little
Submitted: 6-10-2010

 

Benjamin Franklin Jamison was born, lived, and died in Bedford County, Pa. The farmer, Union soldier, school teacher, Justice of the Peace, husband of Caroline (Whetstone) Jamison, and father of ten, survived, Antietam, The Wilderness, Potomac River, Spotsylvania, North Anna River, Cold Harbor, and Andersonville Prison.

Ben volunteered twice for service in the Union Army. Born March 19, 1843, in East Providence Township, the son of David Jamison, Sr., and Sophia (Defibaugh) Jamison, young Ben was a farmer in Snake Spring Valley, before volunteering. The blue eyed, fair complexed, light haired, 5'8" lad, enlisted in Huntiondon, Pa., on August 7, 1862, as a private in Company I, 125th Infantry Regiment, Pa. Volunteers.

Less than two months later, on September 17th, 1862, at The Battle of Antietam Creek, near Sharpsburg, Md., Ben was shot in the left thigh. He was first removed to the hospital a Chambersburg, Pa., and remained there for eight days. He was then moved to Harrisburg, Pa., and lodged in a school house downtown and treated for his wounds. A few days later he was moved to the Walnut Street Hospital, then to Camp Curtin, Harrisburg, Pa. He contracted typhoid fever and was so delirious he did not recognize his father who had been summoned and stayed with Ben for eight weeks, while he was being treated by Dr. Hays. The first part of January 1863, he was given a leave of absence by the physicians to go home. His father accompanied him on the train. Ben was so weak, he was not able to walk or help himself, nor did he regain saneness until April. He was discharged from the Army, May 18th, 1863.

So ended round one of Benjamin F. Jamison vs The Confederacy. One would think, enough is enough, but after ten months of healing at home, the Bedford County farmer went back for more. On February 22, 1864, he once again enrolled, as a private, this time in Company B, 110th Infantry Regiment, Pa. Volunteers. The first time he served he received $13.00 a month, which was a private's pay in those days. This time he received a $60.00 bounty, plus one month's pay of $13.00 in advance. He was next listed on the March 11, 1864, muster roll of the 110th Regiment Pa. Infantry, at Carlisle Barracks, Carlisle, Pa.

The Spring of 1864 brought General Grant's Overland Campaign. In May, Private Jamison was part of The Battle of the Wilderness, on May 6th; Potomac River, on May 10th; Spotsylvania, May 12th, 14th, and 19th; North Anna River and Cold Harbor, where he was captured, on June 2nd, 1864. He was confined at Richmond, Va., June 3rd and shipped by railcar, with other Yankee prisoners, to Andersonville, Ga. Arriving June 8th, 1864, he was held prisoner in the open stockade, where thousands of men died of starvation, exposure and disease.

After surviving nine months in Andersonville Prison, Union soldier number 153-871, was paroled at Wilmington, N.C., March 1st, 1865. From there, he was taken by steamship to the U.S. Army General Hospital, Division 2, Saint John's College, Annapolis, Md., where he was a patient from March 27th, until furloughed April 24th, 1865. The depot Quarter-Master's office furnished furlough transportation for Ben from Annapolis, Md, to Harrisburg, Pa. at a cost of $2.77. Ben drew the following articles of clothing: (1) forage cap, (1) flannel sack coat, (1) pr. trousers, (2) flannel shirts, (2) prs. drawers, (2) stockings, and (1) great coat. These items were deducted from his pay when he was mustered out at Harrisburg, Pa., May 21st, 1865.

On May 9th, 1867, in Everett, Pa., Benjamin married Caroline Whetstone, daughter of Samuel Whetstone and Julia Ann (Cogan) Whetstone. The young couple settled in Loysburg, Pa., where Ben was a school teacher, Justice of the Peace, known as, "Squire Jamison". They built a home on the northern end of the village, had ten children, and were active in the Reformed Church. He died April 16, 1920, and is buried in the cemetery beside the Saint John's United Church of Christ, in Loysburg.

In January of 2004, Benjamin F. Jamison's name was added to the Andersonville Prisoner Profile, as a survivor. His name also was added to the "Walkway of Valor" in the National Civil War Museum in Harrisburg, Pa., to honor his service in both the 125th and the 110th.

Benjamin Jamison's Great-Great Grandson and namesake is, Benjamin James Little. His Great-Great-Great Grandson, who also carries his name, is Noah Benjamin Martin, both of Bedford County, Pa. 

 
by: G. W. LIttle
Loysburg, Pa
 
The information for this story is from the U.S. National Archives, The Jamison Family Bible, Andersonville Prisoner Profile and The National Civil War Museum. Researched by J. Arthur Little and Gaylord W. Little  
 

 

 

Benjamin Franklin Jamison
Submitted by: Gaylord Wayne Little


Benjamin Franklin Jamison
Submitted by: Gaylord Wayne Little


Benjamin Franklin Jamison and wife Caroline
Submitted by: Gaylord Wayne Little


Family of Squire Benjamin Franklin Jamison, Loysburg, Pa.
Submitted by: Gaylord Wayne Little


Benjamin Franklin Jamison and James Patton Little
Submitted by: Gaylord Wayne Little


Charles Edgar Little and Clara Virginia (Jamison) Little
Submitted by: Gaylord Wayne Little


Clara Virginia (Jamison) Little
Submitted by: Gaylord Wayne Little


James Arthur Little and E. Marie (Kagarise) Little
Submitted by: Gaylord Wayne Little


Benjamin & Jessica Little
Submitted by: Gaylord Wayne Little


Gaylord & Tonia Little
Submitted by: Gaylord Wayne Little


Noah Benjamin Martin
Submitted by: Gaylord Wayne Little

 







                       

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